2017 Daniel Pearl Intern: Emma Johanningsmeier

Emma Johanningsmeier has been chosen as the 2017 Daniel Pearl Memorial Journalism Intern. Johanningsmeier is a junior double-majoring in Comparative Literature and Italian. She has studied in Italy and lived in Germany, and previously interned at the Omaha World-Herald in Omaha, Nebraska, her hometown.

Jennifer Pan’s research featured in The Atlantic

Pan and colleagues analyzed tens of thousands of posts written by China’s official social-media trolls. Rather than debating critics directly, the Chinese government tries to derail conversation on social media it views as dangerous.

Communication Ph.D. student publishes in Science

Rene Kizilcec’s paper on “Closing Global Achievement Gaps in MOOCs” has just been published in Science. Members of less-developed countries may suffer from the cognitive burden of wrestling with feeling unwelcome while trying to learn and, therefore, underperform.

The Real Story About Fake News Is Partisanship

Partisan tribalism makes people more inclined to seek out and believe stories that justify their pre-existing partisan biases, whether or not they are true. Shanto Iyengar and former doctoral student Sean Westwood discuss partisan divide.

Jakki Bailey

Bailey  is interested in the psychological and social impact of media as well as the use of technology for learning.   Her current work examines the impact that embodied mediated experiences have on cognition and behavior.

Can trust in people save politics?

While trust in politicians and institutions may be at an all-time low, we trust one another more than ever. In a Wide Angle video, Jeff Hancock, Stanford professor of communication, suggests that this trust will help us rebuild it more broadly.

Charlie Rose interviews Jeremy Bailenson

In this video, Bailenson discusses how VHIL is seeking to better understand the impact that virtual reality has on human behavior and change the way people think about areas such as education, empathy and the environment.

Daniel Muise

Muise’s interests focus on the effect of advanced telecommunications capacity on disparity and political development under repressive and transitional regimes, specifically regarding data privacy and vulnerable populations.

Mufan Luo

Luo’s research focuses on the psychology of communication technology, which involves the examination of interpersonal dynamics in computer-mediated communication (CMC) and social media affordances.