Frequently Asked Questions

How many students are admitted each year and how many are there in the program?

5-6 students are admitted per year. We have approximately 30 Ph.D. students.

What are the amounts awarded for fellowships and assistantships? Is everyone funded the first year?

Fellowship support is available for 2 or 3 quarters of the first year, and various forms of support are available for subsequent quarters. Currently, five years of support are guaranteed for students who are making satisfactory progress toward the degree. Forms of support include both teaching and research assistantships. For students matriculating in fall 2016, fellowships awarded will cover tuition and a living stipend of $8,886 per quarter.

Is health insurance covered and is additional funding available for the summer?

Health insurance is covered for the fall, winter, and spring quarters. For students enrolled in these three academic quarters, summer coverage is also guaranteed. See Stanford University’s Cardinal Care for more information. While summer support in the form of a fellowship or assistantship is not guaranteed, students have often received summer funding through their advisor(s).

How many units of courses can a student with a Master’s degree transfer for credit toward Ph.D.?

The University will transfer up to 45 units of credit for a Master’s degree toward the Ph.D. degree in Communication.

Where can I find more information about the faculty’s published works?

Most faculty list their published work on the faculty pages on the department web site or on their personal or lab web sites.

How many core courses does a Ph.D. student have to take?

There are 5 core courses that every first year student has to take — 301, 311, 314, 317, and 318 — that are provided for them exclusively. In addition, the Ph.D. students need to take 206 and 208, courses that are also open to Master’s students. Before the end of their third year, Ph.D. students must complete a course in statistics, an advanced methods course, and three series of lecture and seminar courses.