Silicon Valley tech culture has roots in Burning Man

Prof. Fred Turner has been studying the role of art and countercultural movements – including the communal, participatory lifestyle celebrated at the annual Burning Man festival – that have had far-reaching influence in the workplace of tech firms.

Rebele Symposium: The Journalism We Need

What kind of journalism do we need, and what are the ramifications of journalism not fulfilling this need? Eight scholars from six countries came together to discuss this question by addressing the intensifying connections between journalism, justice, and digital technologies.

Fear and Loathing in the Body Politic

Prof. Shanto Iyengar and Graduate School of Business Prof. Neil Malhotra discuss affective polarization. Interparty animus is clearly manifest in real-world behaviors — and the pervasiveness of these effects is astonishing.

Big little lies of mobile dating

Lying about availability is a common deception mobile app daters tell their potential partners, according to a new paper by Prof. Jeff Hancock and David Markowitz

How to create empathy in VR

Prof. Jeremy Bailenson discusses the growing body of scientific evidence showing that creating empathy in virtual reality is more successful if the headset wearer moves around.

52nd Carlos Kelly McClatchy Symposium

“Virtual Reality, Real Implications: How VR will shape people, business, and government” features Courtney Cogburn (Columbia University), Tom Wheeler (former head of the FCC), and Philip Rosedale (High Fidelity).

Rescuing Democracy: From Ancient Athens to Brexit

Professor James Fishkin discusses how an old idea from ancient Athens — selecting random citizens to deliberate — is making a difference around the world from bringing wind power to Texas to reforming the Mongolian constitution.

Your phone really does make you feel good, study says

Social Media Lab researchers contend that you’re not necessarily addicted if you need to be with your phone all the time. The mere presence of your phone is a more pleasant and productive experience than the complete absence of that beloved device.

How We Became Bitter Political Enemies

“If you go back to the days of the Civil War, one can find cases in American political history where there was far more rancor and violence,” says Shanto Iyengar. “But in the modern era, there are no ‘ifs’ and ‘buts’ — partisan animus is at an all-time high.”

51st Carlos Kelly McClatchy Symposium

“Under Threat: The Future of Foreign Correspondence” features NPR Foreign Editor William Dobson, BuzzFeed International News Editor Miriam Elder, and New York Times Foreign Editor Michael Slackman. Moderated by the Communication Department’s Janine Zacharia.

8 minutes to MOOC success

René Kizilcec, doctoral candidate in communication, is lead author of a study showing that a simple writing activity increased online course completion rates for those from individualistic, but not collectivist, cultures.